Whisky Notes: Kilkerran Glengyle

Whisky from Scotland is broken up into several regions: Speyside, Highlands, Lowlands, Islay, and Campbeltown. If you are a believer or not, there are some suggestions that “Islands” be there own region. I’ll let you decide if you want to follow classification or not.

My wife is amazing and bought me a wonderful birthday present: the Kilkerran Glenglye 12 year old whisky from the self-proclaimed “newest, old distillery in Campbeltown” with an interesting history that you can read about here. Apparently, there were only 9,000 bottles made of this stuff.

You don’t care about me telling you about the distillery. You want to know about the dram. Let’s talk whisky. The Kilkerran Glenglye 12 year old is non-chill filtered and with no added coloring. It is bottled at 46% ABV. The whisky was matured in 70% bourbon, 30% sherry casks giving it a great nose and taste. Below are my tasting notes:

Nose: brown sugar or toffee, brine (subtle), grass (subtle), dried apricots, green woodiness, oak.

Palate: sweetness resembling honey with lemon peel, possibly angel food cake, vanilla. Palate not nearly as developed as the nose.

Finish: grassy notes, lingering bitterness, slightly oily, slightly briny

This is an easy, everyday drinker with the price point is £35 per 70 cl bottle (if you were one of the lucky ones able to buy it before it sold out).

Update: The palate improved considerably after having been opened and exposed to air. It tastes much, much better and, in my opinion, definitely needed some oxygen.

Whisky Notes: Aultmore 12

Many of you know that Jen and I were on the committee (USA language: officers) of the Cambridge University Whisky Appreciation Society (CUWAS) – Jen was the Vice-President and I was the webmaster/IT guy. Let’s be honest though; work sometimes kept me away from maintaining the website, so Jen definitely stepped in to help when something needed to be done in a time-dependent manner.

If you live in the Cambridge, England area, definitely check out the society and go to one of their events. Each tasting is an opportunity to try six whiskies, generally along some sort of theme. This term’s events look really varied:
Introduction to Whisky – this event is great for those who may not know much about whisky but still great whisky for those that do
Liquid Gold – some of the “best of the best” whiskies currently available
Out of its Element – if I had to guess, this would include whiskies that don’t generally fit into their own genre: a smoky Speyside or Highland whisky or an unpeated Islay)
The well-loved Christmas tasting – whiskies that just make you want to settle in and enjoy the winter season
They also snuck in a Brandy tasting this term, which shouldn’t disappoint!

Both Jen and I receive a lot of questions on what whiskies we recommend or normally drink (or in Jen’s current state (pregnancy), what she used to drink or what she’s looking forward to drinking in 15 weeks from now). Since I have the “chore” of trying to drink all of our opened bottles of whisky in the next several month before we move again, I thought it would be fun to give you some tasting notes on what I’m drinking. I guess that’s the least I can do!

Without further ado, here is some general information on the Aultmore 12, why we have it in our possession, and my tasting notes*:
Last fall, Jen bought a couple of bottles of whisky that were released by Dewar’s as part of their The Last Great Malts series. There was some sort of online contest that required participants to purchase two bottles in the series to be registered to win all eight of the series. The series included three bottlings of Aberfeldy (12, 16, and 21 year olds), Aultmore (12 and 25 year olds), and Craigellachie (13, 17, and 23 year olds). She loves a good whisky contest and/or deal; this is the reason of why we have a bottle of the Aultmore 12 in our whisky collection.
Aultmore of the Foggie Moss, as the label reads, is non-chill filtered and has no added colorings. Hence its lovely pale caramelly-yellow color. The whisky is bottled at 46% ABV and can be found at various places for just under £45 per bottle.

Nose: Fresh grass, orange chocolate, sponge cake, aromatic and floral undertones. Jen said it smelled like salted caramel-covered apples.

Palate: Vanilla, spice-cake (possibly cinnamon notes), floral notes continue. The overall mouthfeel is spicy and warming.

Finish: Clean and inoffensive. Slightly floral notes. No lingering flavors here. This whisky has a very short finish.

At the price point, this is a very classic example of a Speyside whisky that could be a daily drinker for those who don’t particularly like peated or overly complex whiskies.

*Note: The tasting notes provided here are my own thoughts. Unfortunately, neither Jen nor I were given whisky to review.